Taking a Stand for Patient Experience Excellence

The last month saw an incredible amount of activity for the patient experience movement, from Patient Experience Conference 2015 and its broad opportunity for learning and connection to last week’s Patient Experience Week, that had organizations around the world acknowledging and celebrating the work of so many and the voices of all in ensuring the best in patient experience. Underneath these efforts that are representative of the work taking place each and every day in healthcare, we at The Beryl Institute and through our global community believed it was time to move beyond just action to true commitment in our collective focus on experience excellence.

What does this look like? Beyond the incredible range of resources developed and shared through our global community of practice that can inform and guide each of our journeys, there was a realization that we had a much greater opportunity and I dare say responsibility in aligning our focus and intent on the true importance of patient experience in healthcare today. As a community we have focused every day to reinforce an important point – that patient experience encompasses all that a patient or family member encounters, be it quality, safety, service, cost or outcomes; it is impacted by the engagement of the very people providing and supporting the provision of care; it is driven by a recognition thatpeople, process and place are all fundamental considerations; and it is not a passing fad or simply a measure of satisfaction. Rather, it is a central construct that impacts healthcare organizations and their efforts around the world each and every day. Simply stated, patient experience matters!

We too have recognized that patient experience is more than just an idea; it is an emerging field of research and practice. So in conjunction with the incredibly powerful and energized community of practice that exists, we also framed a foundational body of knowledge, have pushed to expand the boundaries of research via Patient Experience Journal and solidified a professional designation and process for development with the new Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) designation via Patient Experience Institute.

The last piece in all this – from philosophical and strategic alignment, to the physical framework of a vibrant, strong and lasting field of practice – was to identify and underline the critical actions that have emerged as central to achieving excellence in patient experience. We often are asked the question and see it in the conversation throughout the community, “what can we do to achieve the best in experience?” In our work and through the incredible examples of so many doing this critical work each day, we have come to identify what we believe are the guiding principles for patient experience excellence.

As we introduced these ideas last week – our stand for patient experience excellence – we reinforced an important point. These eight essential actions should serve as aspirational and affirmative statements about where we as individuals, organizations and collectively as the patient experience movement should focus our efforts. We offer these as aspirational – as ‘wills’, not ‘shoulds’ – for as the data show so many of us are just starting or are in the midst of our patient experience journey. In fact, if we believe experience is a continuous effort than the journey truly never ends. With that we warmly invite and strongly encourage healthcare organizations globally to consider and commit to theseguiding principles:

We believe organizations and systems committed to providing the best in experience WILL:

  • Identify and support accountable leadership with committed time and focused intent to shape and guide experience strategy
  • Establish and reinforce a strong, vibrant and positive organizational culture and all it comprises
  • Develop a formal definition for what experience is to their organization
  • Implement a defined process for continuous patient and family input and engagement
  • Engage all voices in driving comprehensive, systemic and lasting solutions
  • Look beyond clinical experience of care to all interactions and touch points
  • Focus on alignment across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between
  • Encompass both a focus on healing and a commitment to well-being

As we look at the potential we have in our focus on excellence in patient experience, there is boundless possibility. More so, at its core we find an unquestionable opportunity to reinforce the great value of all who participate in the healthcare conversation and all who are touched by it. Commitments as strong as they may seem, or as aspirational as they may be, are only of impact if they are moved from words to action. That is my ultimate challenge to you as the patient experience community and as the healthcare community as a whole.

These are not just concepts, but rather they are commitments to action – for our organizations, for our people, for all those we care for and serve and for the kind of healthcare world we have the desire to, and I know we have the capability, to create. I invite you, encourage you and call on you to join us in taking a stand for all we can do for experience excellence. Only good things can come of these actions if we take them together.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Patient Experience Matters

As the final hours before Patient Experience Conference 2015 count down, I am reminded of the importance of the journey we have set out upon. When we work, as one community, encompassing a diversity of thought and experiences, on a cause so central to healthcare – the experience of all in our global system of care – only good things can happen. For so many committed to the best in experience for the patients, residents and families they serve – be they the almost 35,000 members and guests of The Beryl Institute Community, the readership of Patient Experience Journal from over 100 countries, the volunteer leaders and content contributors, writers, tweeters, caregivers and support staff around the globe – we often find ourselves in small pockets of people, likeminded in purpose and focus. Tackling this work in small bands spread far can at times be exhausting, even knowing you have the support of the thousands in our virtual community.

I, too, know that there is power in the ability to come together and recall the words shared by a participant in the closing conference discussion session we held at the end of our first patient experience conference now five years ago. (Yes, it was intimate enough we could all have one discussion.) That person stood, with the polished, but worn glean of a conference well spent, of learning gained and new connections made, and said “I now know I am not alone.” It was a profound and awakening statement that has been a fundamental root of our last five years in growing the Institute community. First, that you, as professionals or as patient or family members, are not alone on this journey and second, there is a place you can come to connect, find support, contribute, be vulnerable, breathe, smile and grow. But more so, there is a special moment when you can do that with one another together at Patient Experience Conference.

I have heard some call the event a family reunion and others call it the recharge they needed from a year of draining work. In all descriptions, I have heard something underlying it all – Patient Experience Conference, while a “conference” in title, is nothing like any other healthcare conference experience you can or will have. Others may have summits, conferences or symposiums with the requisite healthcare structures, protocols and learning. From that we do not differ, but what you do find are the people and the connections that last well beyond just three days a year.

Since our first Patient Experience Conference, I have opened reinforcing that important point – that in looking around the room, the power of our time together is in more than lessons shared, PowerPoints projected or even compelling stories told. It is in the gift of being together, of those around you, and all you and they have to offer. When we spend the next three days in Dallas, that will happen once again. Together, we will create a gathering not meant to highlight one organization or a specific product, but rather bring life to an event that is committed to the very idea that is at the heart of the importance I mention above. Simply stated, patient experience matters.

It matters because it touches the lives of so many leading to quality, safe, service-focused encounters conscious of cost, committed to outcomes, open to all voices and intent on nothing but the best for all we care for from healing to the fate of spending one’s last days in dignity. You see, we are all the patient experience. So I, too, look forward to the next few days ahead, but in highlighting their importance, return to a point so central to our work. We are not in this alone, and there is a community to support you every day of the year. I am proud of what we – our community of committed leaders around the world – have created, humbled by the cause we have taken on and inspired by all I know we have yet to do together.

Jason A. Wolf, PhD
President
The Beryl Institute

The importance of invitation in patient experience excellence

I was talking to a member recently who asked what has been the key to our growth at The Beryl Institute over the last few years from an idea to a global community now engaging over 30,000 members and guests from around the world. My response came quickly. It is the willingness to ask – that is to invite people to participate, to get involved, to offer ideas, to provide input, ultimately to engage in our efforts and in this movement.

It was for both of us, a subtle, but profound moment, as the individual was struggling with how to move from mandating compliance to experience efforts in their organization to creating a sense of involvement and ownership for action. For me, I realized it has been a sense of openness to all ideas, perspectives and voices, the value of abundance I challenged us all to consider in starting this year, that has supported our own ongoing efforts to invite the engagement of so many of this journey. I too recognized in our conversation that invitation was not only an opportunity for growth, it provided a powerful idea for patient, resident and family experience excellence itself.

Invitation is a simple, yet profound act. It requires a strong sense of self-understanding, a willingness to be vulnerable and open to new discoveries. In offering an invitation we acknowledge the value of others and express our respect for and trust in their presence. More so invitations themselves are the seeds of new possibilities.

When I think about what organizations work to accomplish for those in their care at all points of interaction across the continuum, the greatest opportunity we may have is to invite. If we believe experience excellence is driven by both the engagement of the people in our organizations and those we care for, why just create opportunities for engagement and hope others respond? Rather we must create them and invite people to act.

How can we do this in healthcare today? For our own teams we can invite input on new ideas or participation in strategic efforts or even tactical planning. For patients, residents and families we can invite their participation in both personal and organizational opportunities. As individuals, we can engage them in their care planning, involve them in shift transition conversations or even post care decisions. Organizationally we can invite involvement in patient, resident and/or family advisory councils, we can engage people in strategic planning sessions or on operating councils or boards.

I believe there is a significant difference in hearing “people are just not engaged” if we simply work to create opportunities we hope people will take advantage of versus creating those opportunities and actively inviting participation. Yes, it is through inviting that we have the greatest of opportunities in creating cultures and interactions that will drive the best in experiences. How will you create opportunities for invitation in your own organizations for both whom you work with and those you serve?

In that spirit of invitation then I would be remiss in not living up to the response I offered my colleague. While there are so many ways to engage in the patient experience movement, first I invite you to consider joining us for Patient Experience Conference 2015. As a central community gathering for people committed to experience excellence at points all across the continuum of care and supporting those efforts, this event provides for a coming home and/or a recharging for some, and an awakening and/or learning opportunity for many others. More importantly it connects you with fellow travelers on this journey and committed to this cause from which to build lasting connections.

With that I too must invite you and your organizations to consider our most rapidly growing opportunity in the Institute itself, Institutional Memberships. These incredible connections have stretched the boundaries of the experience conversation in ways we could not anticipate and to corners of the world we could not imagine. It also reinforces the fact that the experience of those in our care is an ongoing and relentless pursuit and connecting to a broader community and support network can only help each of us be stronger. That is it, the power of invitation exemplified.

Many of you may have heard of Shel Silverstein, one of the earliest poets I digested as a child. And while seemingly focused on children in his writings, his message resonates for all of us. He wrote a wonderful piece called “Invitation”:

If you are a dreamer, come in
If you are a dreamer, a wisher, a liar,
A hope-er, a pray-er, a magic bean buyer…
If you’re a pretender, come sit by the fire
For we have some flax-golden tales to spin.
Come in!
Come in!
– Shel Silverstein

There is incredible simplicity in the art of invitation, and yet it has the opportunity for unparalleled impact on all we do in healthcare today. I invite you to join us. Come in!

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Reflecting on The Patient Experience Movement: The Power of Voices and Collaboration

As we stand at the end of each year, we tend to look back at all that led us to this moment and anticipate all that lies ahead. I stand here now with all of you that comprise our patient experience community, who live and breathe in your every action this patient experience movement, and can say without hesitation that together we have accomplished great things and together there are even more powerful moments to come.

Collaboration-v2

This year has exemplified our core values at The Beryl Institute – the importance of community and the integral role of collaboration. We have worked to reinforce the true power of engaging all voices in the patient experience conversation. This gathering of voices has seen our patient experience community grow from 11,000 to 20,000 members and guests this year alone, representing over 45 countries. This gathering of voices has led to a year in which the foundational ideas of this movement have been reinforced and solidified. In our commitment to expand access to the greatest breadth and depth of individuals across healthcare we recently expanded our membership framework to provide access to all associates in any healthcare facility. These Institutional memberships enable staff at all levels, in all roles, across the range of healthcare organizations to engage, to learn and to lead in their own environments.

In expanding the conversation on voice itself, this year has been shaped by the Voices of Patient Experience series in which we heard from the C-Suite, front-line practice, students across healthcare disciplines, physicians, patients and families and those measuring the impact of our patient experience efforts. This collection of voices served to complement the many others that contributed to learning and sharing of ideas via webinars and case studiesPatient Experience Conference presentations and On the Road visits. Hundreds of you added your thoughts to the conversation via these and other outlets. This open sense of sharing, of giving, of collaboration has allowed the patient experience movement to thrive.

The voices series also raised a significant awareness for the community; to be an organization truly committed to patient experience, we had to move beyond the talk about what we do “to” patients and families, and reinforce an unwavering commitment to do “with”. This partnership in care underlines the very intent of the Institute to provide a place to learn from one another, and it was clear that included the voices of patients and families themselves. This led us to establish the Global Patient & Family Advisory Council, comprised of leading patient and family thinkers, writers, speakers and activists. It also had us collaborate with IHI at the 2013 National Forum to support the “Patient is In” Booth in which patients and family members could share input and ideas with forum participants. These voices remind us of the boundless value of this partnership in patient experience improvement.

The expansion of voices also led to the 2nd State of Patient Experience Study, the largest conducted to date on patient experience efforts, and revealed some interesting trends in the both the focus, intent and awareness of patient experience efforts. Yet, while the movement continues to push on, less than 50% of U.S. hospitals have yet to formally define patient experience for themselves. We still have great opportunities to educate and learn from one another.

This awareness made it only natural that we expand our efforts overall on the professional development of patient experience champions, furthering the work on the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge with domain outlines and the anticipated release of the domain courses in 2014. As a community you reinforced your desire and the greater need to shape this work in ways that will allow each and every one of us to grow stronger. The year ahead brings even more exciting work on this front.

In a recent Hospital Impact blog I mentioned my great excitement about the growth of the patient experience family overall, from new sister organizations to research entities focusing on this area, to critical gatherings in numerous places in support of this important discussion. We will continue to support and reinforce the value of all these efforts and maintain that in collaboration we all win in this movement. We remain committed to serving as a hub and connector of the many voices focused on this effort and keep our arms open for the opportunities for further collaboration.

This very idea led to us to begin conversations with and engage in a formal collaboration with the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) and its 40 years of incredible history and commitment to patient voice, rights and advocacy. A strong and storied organization whose roots can be found at the very start of the patient experience movement, SHCA felt they found a home for their future with The Beryl Institute, but I would say while the container is the Institute, the home is the community of peers, of leaders and teachers, of resource providers and caregivers, of patients and families who make up this growing professional home for so many. The integration with SHCA and the purposeful collaboration with a growing number of organizations committed to this cause help reinforce the power that collaboration itself brings to this conversation.

I would be remiss if I did not add a personal note to this reflection on the year, that as I stood on stage to close Patient Experience Conference 2013 and received the call that I needed to rush home for the delivery of my son, I shifted abruptly from champion and advocate for a movement to a family member surround by a healthcare system still admittedly learning itself. My eyes were opened, not only by the magic of the birth of a child, but of a family member watching your loved ones cared for, your new child handled, complications managed and tense moments relieved. We must not forget we are all patients and family members and need to continue our work as such.

The work you do may at times seem like small gestures, part of your standard process or even done automatically as a seasoned veteran, but to a patient or family member you are providing an incredible gesture of service, of quality, of safety – of experience. In every moment we have the choice to create the experience for our patients and their families. And every moment each of you as members of this community, of this movement, have that choice as well…to engage, to learn, to contribute, and to encourage the involvement of others.

You see this is your community, it is built on the power of your voices, it is driven by the collaboration we find with one another and it is from that place that we look to the new year knowing that the greatest opportunities still lie ahead. Thank you for your contributions, support and leadership. May you have a healthy and happy holiday and be ready with great excitement for all the New Year will bring.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

The Patient Experience Must Be Owned By All: Welcoming the Society of Healthcare Consumer Advocacy

In The Beryl Institute’s recent research report – The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals 2013 – I noted in conclusion that the state of patient experience is growing stronger every day because of the many voices committed to this work. I too reinforced my belief that a patient experience movement is afoot, one that requires continuous and focused efforts and one that should be grounded in and built upon collaboration and alignment versus competition or the desire to stake a claim.

This idea rests at the very core of the global community of practice we have built at The Beryl Institute. We do not claim to own the patient experience, but rather to be a place where people can gather together to share what is best in what they are working to accomplish. Our philosophy has been and will remain that through collaboration not just great, but greater things can happen.

It is in this very spirit of collaboration that I am excited to share the bridging of two great organizations to expand the alignment and dialogue on patient experience improvement. We have been in discussion with and will soon be welcoming the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) into The Beryl Institute community. After an incredible 40 year history and supportive home with the American Hospital Association (AHA), our three organizations – The Beryl Institute, SCHA and AHA – saw great potential in supporting the next 40 years and beyond for SHCA within the Institute (You can read a letter from all of SHCA’s Past Board Presidents here). As of January 1, 2014, our communities will align to continue to expand the patient experience conversation and in doing so model the power of coming together in this critical dialogue.

More details will soon be available around this exciting next step in the history of focus on patient advocacy and more broadly patient experience improvement, but suffice it to say, the commitment to engaging all voices and growing those engaged in this important work is top of mind for us all. I am excited and proud to welcome the SHCA community to The Beryl Institute family as their new professional home and in doing so reiterate the very critical message I share here. That it is in coming together, not attempts at market distinction, in which the greatest outcomes are possible.

I have watched in recent years as patient experience has moved from an emerging term to an active conversation at the center of policy and now financial focus. I have also seen a great game of ownership being played out. Much like one might have experienced during the gold rush, claiming their small bit of mountain stream to pan for hours, days or more in search of that one bright speck, many organizations – some well established, and some quite new – have all worked on positioning for their piece of the pie.

While I am a true believer in free enterprise and recognize the great potential for market savvy in this new world of healthcare, I also believe we have something bigger we are attempting to do in working towards patient experience excellence. It is in the bringing together of disparate thoughts or competing ideas, be they those of resource providers of similar services or healthcare organizations occupying the same market, in which the greatest outcomes can be realized. You see no one organization owns the patient experience, yet we in healthcare must all take ownership of it.

For this reason we have worked to bring the many voices together, for as I asserted above, this is where the strength of our work and its impact rests. This idea has been realized in the Institute’s Regional Roundtables where market “competitors” join together in sharing thoughts and crafting shared plans focused on improvement. It has been realized at Patient Experience Conference where numerous resource providers join in and engage in support of a true, independent community dialogue. It is seen in the willingness of some of the largest players in experience measurement to come together to share ideas between the covers of our soon to be released paper on the Voices of Measurement.

If we are to make the greatest differences in the lives of our patients, families, peers and community we must be open to the idea that above all else through collaboration and coordinated effort profound possibility exists for improvement and sustained impact. And while by my very words, I cannot claim The Beryl Institute is the only place this can or will be done, I do hope and in fact commit that we will continue to stand for the bringing together of all ideas, of every voice and of each hope in each and everything we do. As a community of practice it is our calling, at The Beryl Institute it is our cause and we are so very excited to see (and hopefully be a catalyst in) the patient experience family continuing to grow.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Creating a Body of Knowledge for Patient Experience Leaders

In The Beryl Institute paper, “The Four Cornerstones of Patient Experience”, we discovered that when organizations choose to have a leader with committed time to guide patient experience efforts, those organizations outperform their peers in both HCAHPS performance as well as patient satisfaction results. Finding that intentional focus on an issue leads to better results is not surprising, but it is important to note that a focused individual made the difference.

This led us to ask, if we can show that having an identified patient experience leader is a critical component of success, and specifically in driving measures that have service, quality and financial implications for healthcare organizations, can we define what it is that this individual does?

We started with a small steering team of healthcare professionals from hospitals and organizations across the United States on a mind-mapping exercise to identify key areas of knowledge critical to patient experience leaders. This exercise led to the development of domains that started to frame a core body of knowledge. Job descriptions were explored from roles around the world, competency models were examined from related fields and organizations, and then broader input was sought engaging patient experience and healthcare leaders from the US, the UK, Australia and Canada. The feedback led to hundreds of pages of thoughts on the critical nature and true complexity of patient experience and of the knowledge needed to effectively address it.

The discovery was powerful; a body of knowledge for patient experience leaders that began to shape an identifiable field of practice. It also brought greater clarity to the findings in the “Four Cornerstones” paper. While a focused individual was critical, this alone would not drive patient experience success. Rather an individual needs the skill set and “know-how” to truly impact this central component of the healthcare world.

That leads us to today, where the input and work of over one hundred volunteer leaders and contributors provides an initial framework to explore and a new possibility for shaping the field of patient experience. On Monday, March 5 we unveiled the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge and the 14 domains of knowledge key to an effective patient experience leader. With all the work that has led to this point, it is now that a much broader conversation gets underway.

We invite individuals from all corners of the healthcare system, including patient experience practitioners, healthcare leaders and staff, physicians, patients, families and community members to contribute their voices to the process. For the next 6 weeks, through Monday, April 16, we will be gathering your input to further polish this work. We will share the results of this effort to start Patient Experience Conference 2012. At The Beryl Institute, we believe the patient experience is about every player in the healthcare process and should encompass the voices of all those it impacts.

In healthcare, experience is truly central to all we do. The opportunity to provide a framework for the important work taking place every day in healthcare organizations is a critical global dialogue. I invite and encourage you to join the conversation.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute