Considerations for Patient Experience Excellence: 2016

2016-01 jan2016blogAs we have watched the patient experience movement grow in the last five years of our journey at The Beryl Institute, we have seen increasing levels of commitment to this effort and a refocusing on what matters versus simply what is measured. Many began their involvement in patient experience efforts purely due to motivation by policy, measurement and then eventually financial implications for outcomes. These dynamic shifts driven by policy in the United States were not unique to the country, but rather we have experienced a global wave of acknowledgement of and commitment to action around addressing the experience in healthcare.

What has stirred this broader global movement and created a dynamic shift in how healthcare operates regardless of system or policy? I offer it is connectivity and proximity – not necessarily physical proximity, but what I would call “social proximity”. Social proximity, driven by connectivity, access to information, an open willingness to share ideas, constant access to research, news and even rumors all contribute to an environment for humankind that has dramatically shifted in the last decade and with increasing speed in the last few years.

So what are the implications for this on patient experience? We are now at a critical turning point where one can no longer diminish or downplay that experience matters. In fact, I would warn those that do or more so resist or fight this shift, that you will soon be swallowed up by the tides if you choose not to climb aboard. We are at a pivotal time in the journey due to these and many other dynamics changing how we deliver care and how consumers of care perceive and expect it.

2016 provides an interesting transition point now 15 years into this rapidly flowing century. In thinking about the year ahead, I offer some considerations whether patient and family member, healthcare provider or a company providing services and resources to healthcare – we are now all in this together.

  • Experience is a MACRO issue. We are no longer talking about “experience of care” as first portrayed in the Triple Aim. Rather we are now readily acknowledging and acting to encompass quality, safety, service, cost, environment, transitions and all the spaces in between in the experience equation
  • Patient and family (consumer) voice is stronger than it has ever been (and won’t be quieting down any time soon). Patients have found their voices in new ways and are showing a fearless willingness to challenge what was once a paternalistic model to raise their own wants and needs.
  • Technology is no longer a differentiator, i.e., specifically saying you are engaging in technology solutions. It will be how you use technology, the information it can provide and the way it impacts your ability to provide care and more positive experiences that will matter most.
  • Tactics, even strong ones may move you forward, but will not support you in achieving ultimate success. There is now a clear recognition that experience efforts are no longer driven simply by a list of tactics, but rather by comprehensive strategies with unwavering focus and committed investment.
  • The “soft stuff” matters and all engaged in healthcare are expressing this in their own ways. Our latest State of Patient Experience study reinforced this very point; that culture, leadership and the people in your organization are the primary keys to driving strong outcomes and overall success.
  • We need to stop calling the “soft stuff” soft. It is perhaps the most challenging and intense area of focus we can and should have in organizational life. Culture change, aligning leadership, ensuring actively engaged people is perhaps the hardest work we can take on. So while deemed soft (perhaps even as an excuse for an inability to affect them), we cannot relent in a commitment to make these efforts central to any plan.
  • “Sharing is cool” – yes for you parents out there I just quoted Pete the Cat (Pete’s Big Lunch to be exact). It remains astonishing to me how so much of what we espouse to our children as critical skills, we lose as we move forward in our careers. Experience excellence is driven not by how much you know as an organization, but rather how much you are willing to share. A value-based world competes on the execution to excellence not simply volume and we should not be hypnotized by one “way” as sacred. It is in our willingness so share broadly and openly that we collectively win. The new healthcare environment calls on us to do this.
  • The global dialogue on experience excellence is emerging as boundary-less and systems will look beyond organizational constraints to the commonalities they can find in driving the best in outcomes for all being cared for or caring for others.

I conclude with one more consideration:

  • Aim high, but start where you have solid ground. I remain resolute that we all have a commitment, whether we have yet acknowledged it or not, to provide the best in experience in healthcare (and must be willing to fully engage in what experience encompasses). Change will increasingly be transformational in healthcare and in simple choices great shifts can occur, but it will take the building blocks of success on which to reach the greatest heights.

Icarus, who in an act of great hubris and in an attempt to achieve it all, flew too close to the sun with his wax wings and fell to the sea. As we look to 2016, we must never let the big ideas fade from view or the small ideas impede our progress. It will be finding a way in which to move each of our organizations forward from where they are, with an understanding that the world is dramatically shifting all around us with increasing speed, where success can be achieved. This is our new world in healthcare and in the patient experience movement that now churns at its core. I believe if we are clear in our efforts and intent, we can and will achieve the best in outcomes for all. Here is to a great year ahead.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D
President
The Beryl Institute

How Will You Invest in Patient Experience in 2016?

2015-12 BlogWe recently celebrated our first five years as a community of practice and looked back, somewhat in awe, at the incredible growth of this organization over such a short time. The Beryl Institute is now a global community of almost 40,000 individuals passionate about improving the healthcare experience for patients, families and caregivers.

The momentum continues, as does the realization that organizations are making significant investments in time, energy and dollars to ensure they are prepared to deliver the best possible patient experience. We see these investments in many forms from hiring teams to training leaders and staff to building and supporting cultures of excellence.

As we shared in the 2015 State of Patient Experience Benchmarking study, senior patient experience leadership and staff investment is growing with 42% of respondents having a Chief Experience Officer (or comparable position) compared to only 22% two years ago.  Along with that, the size of patient experience teams is growing; 33% of organizations reported having five or more staff members supporting patient experience efforts.

The Beryl Institute community reflects this trend as well. This year over 200 organizations will invest in institutional membership – meaning they provide unlimited access to the Institute’s white papers, webinars, topic calls, learning bites, etc. to everyone within their facility. They are making a statement that people in ALL roles impact the patient experience and should have access to research and collaboration that will assist their efforts.

We have also seen tremendous interest in learning and professional development programs intended to train patient experience leaders and other staff. We recently increased our virtual classroom offerings in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge courses to support growing participation in the community-developed program that provides Certificates in Patient Experience Leadership and Patient Advocacy.

Patient Experience Conference had its largest attendance to date this year and we were honored to partner with member organizations to host sold out Regional Roundtable events in San Francisco, Charlotte and Minneapolis. Our community is eager to gain (and share) knowledge and to invest in their personal career growth. In fact, today our sister organization, Patient Experience Institute, will offer the first testing opportunity for those hoping to earn their CPXP, the professional certification for Patient Experience Leaders.

While we’re excited to celebrate the five-year milestone, we acknowledge how much work is still to be done. We imagine (and hope to help inspire) a world where all healthcare organizations appreciate the power and impact of patient experience efforts and make without hesitation the investments necessary to be the best they can be for patients and families.

Earlier this year we released Our Stand, a list of guiding principles we’ve identified in our five years of leading this work that can have significant impact on patient experience success. I share them again as a reminder as you evaluate your own efforts and consider what investment opportunities make sense to support your specific needs.

We believe organizations and systems committed to providing the best in experience WILL:

  • Identify and support accountable leadership with committed time and focused intent to shape and guide experience strategy
  • Establish and reinforce a strong, vibrant and positive organizational culture and all it comprises
  • Develop a formal definition for what experience is to their organization
  • Implement a defined process for continuous patient and family input and engagement
  • Engage all voices in driving comprehensive, systemic and lasting solutions
  • Look beyond clinical experience of care to all interactions and touch points
  • Focus on alignment across all segments of the continuum and the spaces in between
  • Encompass both a focus on healing and a commitment to well-being

As you prepare for the coming year I challenge you to reflect on your organization’s commitment to experience improvement. Where are you exceling and where are your opportunities to do even more for your patients, families, caregivers and staff? Our patient experience community is here to support your journey and I encourage you to take full advantage of the incredible resources and knowledge available.

Wishing you a wonderful holiday season and a successful New Year!

Stacy Palmer
Vice President, Strategy and Member Experience
The Beryl Institute

The Patient Experience Must Be Owned By All: Welcoming the Society of Healthcare Consumer Advocacy

In The Beryl Institute’s recent research report – The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals 2013 – I noted in conclusion that the state of patient experience is growing stronger every day because of the many voices committed to this work. I too reinforced my belief that a patient experience movement is afoot, one that requires continuous and focused efforts and one that should be grounded in and built upon collaboration and alignment versus competition or the desire to stake a claim.

This idea rests at the very core of the global community of practice we have built at The Beryl Institute. We do not claim to own the patient experience, but rather to be a place where people can gather together to share what is best in what they are working to accomplish. Our philosophy has been and will remain that through collaboration not just great, but greater things can happen.

It is in this very spirit of collaboration that I am excited to share the bridging of two great organizations to expand the alignment and dialogue on patient experience improvement. We have been in discussion with and will soon be welcoming the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) into The Beryl Institute community. After an incredible 40 year history and supportive home with the American Hospital Association (AHA), our three organizations – The Beryl Institute, SCHA and AHA – saw great potential in supporting the next 40 years and beyond for SHCA within the Institute (You can read a letter from all of SHCA’s Past Board Presidents here). As of January 1, 2014, our communities will align to continue to expand the patient experience conversation and in doing so model the power of coming together in this critical dialogue.

More details will soon be available around this exciting next step in the history of focus on patient advocacy and more broadly patient experience improvement, but suffice it to say, the commitment to engaging all voices and growing those engaged in this important work is top of mind for us all. I am excited and proud to welcome the SHCA community to The Beryl Institute family as their new professional home and in doing so reiterate the very critical message I share here. That it is in coming together, not attempts at market distinction, in which the greatest outcomes are possible.

I have watched in recent years as patient experience has moved from an emerging term to an active conversation at the center of policy and now financial focus. I have also seen a great game of ownership being played out. Much like one might have experienced during the gold rush, claiming their small bit of mountain stream to pan for hours, days or more in search of that one bright speck, many organizations – some well established, and some quite new – have all worked on positioning for their piece of the pie.

While I am a true believer in free enterprise and recognize the great potential for market savvy in this new world of healthcare, I also believe we have something bigger we are attempting to do in working towards patient experience excellence. It is in the bringing together of disparate thoughts or competing ideas, be they those of resource providers of similar services or healthcare organizations occupying the same market, in which the greatest outcomes can be realized. You see no one organization owns the patient experience, yet we in healthcare must all take ownership of it.

For this reason we have worked to bring the many voices together, for as I asserted above, this is where the strength of our work and its impact rests. This idea has been realized in the Institute’s Regional Roundtables where market “competitors” join together in sharing thoughts and crafting shared plans focused on improvement. It has been realized at Patient Experience Conference where numerous resource providers join in and engage in support of a true, independent community dialogue. It is seen in the willingness of some of the largest players in experience measurement to come together to share ideas between the covers of our soon to be released paper on the Voices of Measurement.

If we are to make the greatest differences in the lives of our patients, families, peers and community we must be open to the idea that above all else through collaboration and coordinated effort profound possibility exists for improvement and sustained impact. And while by my very words, I cannot claim The Beryl Institute is the only place this can or will be done, I do hope and in fact commit that we will continue to stand for the bringing together of all ideas, of every voice and of each hope in each and everything we do. As a community of practice it is our calling, at The Beryl Institute it is our cause and we are so very excited to see (and hopefully be a catalyst in) the patient experience family continuing to grow.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Creating a Field of Patient Experience – A Call to Action

Something powerful took place at this year’s Patient Experience Conference and it took some time in reflection for me to sort it out. We opened the conference with the powerful video “I am the Patient Experience” showing the faces of the many individuals key to the Patient Experience. We then reviewed the efforts underway to create a Body of Knowledge, shaping a model for ongoing development of patient experience leaders, and the potential for formal certification. The days together were filled with the connections and learning central to the vision of The Beryl Institute (see the pictures and review the lessons learned).

It culminated with our closing speaker, Tiffany Christensen who brought us the voice of the patient and suggested something profound. She noted that our work in patient experience is truly a movement. In fact, what we are doing together is shaping a field. As the faces of participants declaring “I am the Patient Experience” flashed on the screen to close the time together, it was evident something bigger was happening than a conference or even the growth of a global community of practice.

Captured in the energy and spirit that filled those three days in April, was the same commitment and possibility that was shared by the over 300 individuals from 8 countries that have contributed to framing the 15 domains in the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge or even the over 8,000 members and guests that engage with the Institute community every month. The Body of Knowledge now stands for something bigger than just things we “need to know” to be effective practitioners in patient experience. It represents the foundation of a field grounded in knowledge and experience that can have lasting and profound impact on how those in healthcare work and how patients and families are ultimately cared for.

Creating a field is no small task and will not emerge from any one individual or organization. It must result from the voices of many, which is why I encourage your continued involvement in the Body of Knowledge effort. At The Beryl Institute, we look to be the catalyst, convener and coordinator of this important work. The next steps in the process will be the creation of work teams that will outline the key content for each of the domains of knowledge. Together with respected subject matter experts these outlines will help shape the learning needed to sharpen the skills of current practitioners and create a path to develop future leaders for the field. I invite you to learn more about the process and consider contributing to the work of these teams

I mentioned in a recent Hospital Impact blog that patient experience is not a fad, but is now a critical component of healthcare overall. We must work together to solidify the knowledge needed to lead, continue to support the research that will stretch our ideas and practice and come together as a global community that will take a stand for what we know is right in ensuring the best of experiences for our patients and their families. If we do this with the passion that I saw during our three days together at Patient Experience Conference 2012, there is no doubt that what we are doing is truly creating a field of patient experience.

Jason A. Wolf
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute