Patients and Families Included

patients_included.001Just a short, but incredibly exciting 5 years ago, I was writing my fourth patient experience blog in what has become a monthly occurrence. In that blog I introduced the definition of patient experience created by early contributors to The Beryl Institute community. In those first months of our work we were focused on reinforcing some fundamental ideas and values that have remained at the core of our work at the Institute since that summer we got underway.

In introducing the definition we offered,

“A positive patient experience is created by partnering with patients and their support network (i.e., families or caregivers) to anticipate needs and exceed expectations, recognize the individuality of each patient as a decision maker, form a caring, compassionate and lasting relationship.”

From those very roots we have operated, not from the perspective of providers only, or espoused a singular model or organizational perspective. Rather, we have comfortably left that to those with personal or business interests in what they saw and see as the potential of the patient experience marketplace. Our belief was and remains that the ability to improve the patient experience at a global level is grounded in collaboration and partnership, a welcoming of all perspectives and encouraging open sharing of ideas across segments of healthcare, organizational boundaries and even national borders. This philosophy has led to the largest community of practice dedicated to patient experience improvement, now almost 35,000 people strong representing almost 50 countries around the globe.

The significance here is that from the very beginning of our work we have operated from the mindset that patients and families are partners in the overall experience conversation, or simply stated, patients must be included. I offered this perspective as recently as my Hospital Impact Blog last week, but perhaps more importantly have lived it through our work as we have continued to learn and grow as a community. These efforts have been realized through the inclusion of patient and family voice on our boards from the outset, in our establishment of our Global Patient and Family Advisory Council (GPFAC) and the cutting edge work they continue to push us to explore (including some exciting news to be announced later this month), and they have been seen in our provision of learning and content from webinars and papers, to Patient Experience Conference itself, which has included patient and family voice on stage, in breakouts and in participation for the past few years.

It is for these reasons and grounded in our founding values that we are excited to also reinforce our commitment to the formal efforts around having patients included in healthcare gatherings. The phrase “nothing about me without me” is not new to healthcare, but what is emerging is a more critical intent on ensuring the consumer voice is engaged and included in the broader healthcare conversation – not simply around individual episodes of care, but in the very discussion of policy, procedures and processes that impact all engaging in healthcare globally.

For this reason, “patients included”, is much more than a nice phrase, it is our commitment and should be the commitment of so many other organizations espousing to include or more significantly represent the patient and family voice in healthcare. As a community comprised of all voices, we believed it was important to reinforce this important point.

The “patients included” movement was inspired by an experience and subsequent blog authored by a virtual colleague and thoughtful healthcare leader Lucien Engelen. He offers in recounting the roots of this effort, “When it was my turn to deliver my keynote, I asked the audience ‘How many patients are present here?’ Not one, it appeared. That there should be so much talk about what patients need and want without them being present prompted me to take action.”

The action resulted in the “Patients Included” movement and most recently a full charter guiding a true patients included effort around healthcare events. The charter, created by the voices of patients, caregivers and healthcare leaders in Spring 2015, calls on healthcare events to commit to the following:

  1. Patients or caregivers with experience relevant to the conference’s central theme actively participate in the design and planning of the event, including the selection of themes, topics and speakers.
  2. Patients or caregivers with experience of the issues addressed by the event participate in its delivery, and appear in its physical audience.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 keynote speakers includes patient and family voice and perspective. In addition, when sessions are selected late August, they will also reflect patient and family representation.
  3. Travel and accommodation expenses for patients or carers participating in the advertised programme are paid in full, in advance. Scholarships are provided by the conference organisers to allow patients or carers affected by the relevant issues to attend as delegates.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 offers patient and family scholarships to conference participants to support engaging more patients and family members in the overall patient experience conversation. In addition, patient and family voice throughout our conference keynote speakers are fully covered for fees, travel and accommodation.
  4. The disability requirements of participants are accommodated. All applicable sessions, breakouts, ancillary meetings, and other programme elements are open to patient delegates.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 will accommodate all disability requirements of conference participants for all parts of the program elements.
  5. Access for virtual participants is facilitated, with free streaming video provided online wherever possible.
    • The Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016 will provide conference access and updates to virtual participants through social media and the #PX2016 hashtag. Conference participants actively engage online via social media and conference presentations are made available to participants after the event.

While not every organization may be able to accommodate these commitments due to constraints or other considerations, they reinforce a powerful statement on what including all voices and providing the access to do so truly means. At The Beryl Institute, we ourselves have met these very commitments for our own Patient Experience Conference. Patients and families contribute to program development and review and are critical voices on stage and in breakouts. Scholarships, though modest are provided and accessibility, one of our core operating values, is reinforced, including virtual access to the extent possible via social media and other means.

We do this for more than it being the right thing to do. As a community of practice committed to experience improvement, we also believe that which we espouse and encourage in organizations behavior, we must be willing to do and model ourselves.

Patients included is more than a nice slogan or a feel good effort, it is a fundamental premise to executing on the best in patient experience efforts in healthcare today. We welcome the opportunity as we continue to grow to ensure we maintain this perspective and challenge and encourage the patient experience community and the broader healthcare community to take note. Patient and family voice matters in our ability to provide the best in outcomes, it has and always will.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Patients are Partners in Experience, Not Just Recipients of One

JWBlog6.13In my most recent Hospital Impact blog I noted that “how” we choose to do things in healthcare will and should trump the “what”. This is supported by my travels through numerous healthcare organizations where it is becoming evident that the core practices organizations are using to drive patient experience success are more and more consistent. While some might see this as limiting, I see it as encouraging.

Why is that? It means we are listening to one another, learning from each other and showing an incredible willingness to “steal ideas shamelessly” as a well respected CEO once shared with me in describing a component of their organizational success. That means the ‘what’ we do is not very different location to location. The distinguishing characteristic in experience is not the things you do, but the way in which your deliver. This is at the core of the very definition of patient experience as “the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture”.

This ability to listen and learn from one another is a central value of all we do at The Beryl Institute. As a global community of practice we can (and must) learn from all edges of the community – those Institutions rated the “best” or seen as the “biggest” do not represent the only expertise. Rather it is in trying and executing of ideas in organizations of all shapes, sizes and focus through which excellence is supported and shared. It is based on this premise that the idea of a broad and inclusive range of voices has been so central to our work.

In returning to the conversation of “how”, I reflect on the recent conversations I had with 18 incredible patient and family advocates committed to the work of improving quality, safety and service for patients and families around the world in preparing the most recent paper from The Beryl Institute – Voices of Patients and Families: Partners in the Patient Experience. The stories these individual’s shared of compassion personified and at times the uglier side of care help us realize that there is power in how we choose to manage the interactions we have in healthcare every day. That it is truly more than the tactics, and rather the execution that matters.

The point I make here is all the tactics in the world amount to very little if all they are is something we do TO people in our care. The old language of provider and recipient may well still be used in healthcare, but its use is outdated and indicative of a system in need of change. Patients – yes, you and I, our children and parents, family and friends – are active parts of the healthcare equation, not passive recipients of it. We need to ensure we start acting this way. This perspective is exemplified through the work of such great organizations as the Society for Participatory Medicine.

While there are countless lessons shared by the individuals interviewed in the Voices paper, we inherently know many of them ourselves. Our contributors helped frame three central ideas in ensuring partnership in the care environment:

1. Acknowledge patients are not subjects in the healthcare process or “something” you should talk about or plan for in third person.

2. Recognize patients are not necessarily wired to actively engage in the healthcare process, due both to the complexity of healthcare and the nature of the system itself (that potentially diminishes the role of the patient in an unspoken hierarchy of expertise). You must ask, encourage, and act on the patient’s voice.

3. Consider coordinating efforts to identify and incorporate patient perceptions into the overall planning of care.

Personally, as I continue the journey of new fatherhood, I saw this play out in the very interactions we have had with our pediatrician. At our stage as new parents, we could be scolded, challenged or even talked down to about how we handle situations. Instead our doc engages us based on our questions, our hopes and fears. I know she is getting all the needed clinical work done, but she is including us as patients and family, as partners in the process. This is an active decision on her part, it is one that engages us in the care of our son and ensures a positive experience with every visit. “How” is a choice we can all make in healthcare and is one I believe will make all the difference.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

You are the Patient Experience: A Reflection

2013-04BlogIn just two weeks, hundreds of healthcare leaders, resource providers, patients and family members from around the world will gather together at Patient Experience Conference 2013. This annual gathering continues to amaze me, for while I get to take part in the organization and preparation with an incredible team of planners and volunteers, what happens during these days together is still, in many ways, a surprise.

Why is that, you ask? It comes down to a simple philosophy we work hard to ensure permeates our community at The Beryl Institute each and every day. With as many resources as we continue to provide – from papers, to case studies, On the Roadvisits to research – and our commitment to be the global community of practice and premier thought leader on improving the patient experience, we fundamentally believe the greatest power in our community is the connection and sharing with one another. That is what makes the annual gathering of patient experience leaders so powerful; it is grounded in the learning from and connection with one another and provides a new level of support for what many can feel at times may be a very lonely and challenging adventure.

No one person, organization, provider or vendor “owns” the patient experience and they should not claim to; rather it is ALL of the people who live it, struggle with it, work to improve and yes experience it every day, who do. It is you who truly are keepers of this movement. You are the patient experience. I see our job to create the space for this to happen, provide the information from which you can learn and fundamentally encourage the connections that will help all of us ultimately improve.

In my March Patient Experience Blog, Why Community Matters in Improving Patient Experience, I suggested, “…to provide a true experience, you must think well beyond the physical nature of your facilities or practices to recognize that experience resides in the network of people that surround and are connected to your organization, both near and far.” I would suggest that in the call to action to address the patient experience we remember this fundamental point. This is what also has me encourage people to get engaged, be part of the community, contribute and learn from one another. It is why at the Institute we have launched our Voices of the Patient Experience series to start this year from the perspective of executives, the front line, healthcare students and patients and family members and why we are ensuring patients and family members can participate in Conference 2013 (#patientsincluded).

I also share these thoughts with a new perspective on this passion, from that of a patient and family member myself. Personal experience has led me to spend time (and as someone committed to patient experience, observe the experience) in an emergency department and primary care setting, and has blessed me with the chance to encounter the preparation and expectation setting that happens with both physician and hospital in anticipating the arrival of your first child. These personal encounters have reminded me that each and every one of us committed to this work are also (or will be) that patient or family member.

I share all of this to reiterate my central point, if we are committed to improving patient experience, to ensuring all voices are heard, to providing the best in quality, safety and service, then the opportunity we have and must take advantage of is to tackle this not alone, but as a true global community. Whether in person at Patient Experience Conference, on a call or via an electronic network, the impact that we can have is only heightened through our connections. I encourage your engagement and I urge your sharing. This is an effort worth every moment we spend. I most look forward to all that will still emerge as a surprise!

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute