The Patient Experience Must Be Owned By All: Welcoming the Society of Healthcare Consumer Advocacy

In The Beryl Institute’s recent research report – The State of Patient Experience in American Hospitals 2013 – I noted in conclusion that the state of patient experience is growing stronger every day because of the many voices committed to this work. I too reinforced my belief that a patient experience movement is afoot, one that requires continuous and focused efforts and one that should be grounded in and built upon collaboration and alignment versus competition or the desire to stake a claim.

This idea rests at the very core of the global community of practice we have built at The Beryl Institute. We do not claim to own the patient experience, but rather to be a place where people can gather together to share what is best in what they are working to accomplish. Our philosophy has been and will remain that through collaboration not just great, but greater things can happen.

It is in this very spirit of collaboration that I am excited to share the bridging of two great organizations to expand the alignment and dialogue on patient experience improvement. We have been in discussion with and will soon be welcoming the Society for Healthcare Consumer Advocacy (SHCA) into The Beryl Institute community. After an incredible 40 year history and supportive home with the American Hospital Association (AHA), our three organizations – The Beryl Institute, SCHA and AHA – saw great potential in supporting the next 40 years and beyond for SHCA within the Institute (You can read a letter from all of SHCA’s Past Board Presidents here). As of January 1, 2014, our communities will align to continue to expand the patient experience conversation and in doing so model the power of coming together in this critical dialogue.

More details will soon be available around this exciting next step in the history of focus on patient advocacy and more broadly patient experience improvement, but suffice it to say, the commitment to engaging all voices and growing those engaged in this important work is top of mind for us all. I am excited and proud to welcome the SHCA community to The Beryl Institute family as their new professional home and in doing so reiterate the very critical message I share here. That it is in coming together, not attempts at market distinction, in which the greatest outcomes are possible.

I have watched in recent years as patient experience has moved from an emerging term to an active conversation at the center of policy and now financial focus. I have also seen a great game of ownership being played out. Much like one might have experienced during the gold rush, claiming their small bit of mountain stream to pan for hours, days or more in search of that one bright speck, many organizations – some well established, and some quite new – have all worked on positioning for their piece of the pie.

While I am a true believer in free enterprise and recognize the great potential for market savvy in this new world of healthcare, I also believe we have something bigger we are attempting to do in working towards patient experience excellence. It is in the bringing together of disparate thoughts or competing ideas, be they those of resource providers of similar services or healthcare organizations occupying the same market, in which the greatest outcomes can be realized. You see no one organization owns the patient experience, yet we in healthcare must all take ownership of it.

For this reason we have worked to bring the many voices together, for as I asserted above, this is where the strength of our work and its impact rests. This idea has been realized in the Institute’s Regional Roundtables where market “competitors” join together in sharing thoughts and crafting shared plans focused on improvement. It has been realized at Patient Experience Conference where numerous resource providers join in and engage in support of a true, independent community dialogue. It is seen in the willingness of some of the largest players in experience measurement to come together to share ideas between the covers of our soon to be released paper on the Voices of Measurement.

If we are to make the greatest differences in the lives of our patients, families, peers and community we must be open to the idea that above all else through collaboration and coordinated effort profound possibility exists for improvement and sustained impact. And while by my very words, I cannot claim The Beryl Institute is the only place this can or will be done, I do hope and in fact commit that we will continue to stand for the bringing together of all ideas, of every voice and of each hope in each and everything we do. As a community of practice it is our calling, at The Beryl Institute it is our cause and we are so very excited to see (and hopefully be a catalyst in) the patient experience family continuing to grow.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
President
The Beryl Institute

Creating a Body of Knowledge for Patient Experience Leaders

In The Beryl Institute paper, “The Four Cornerstones of Patient Experience”, we discovered that when organizations choose to have a leader with committed time to guide patient experience efforts, those organizations outperform their peers in both HCAHPS performance as well as patient satisfaction results. Finding that intentional focus on an issue leads to better results is not surprising, but it is important to note that a focused individual made the difference.

This led us to ask, if we can show that having an identified patient experience leader is a critical component of success, and specifically in driving measures that have service, quality and financial implications for healthcare organizations, can we define what it is that this individual does?

We started with a small steering team of healthcare professionals from hospitals and organizations across the United States on a mind-mapping exercise to identify key areas of knowledge critical to patient experience leaders. This exercise led to the development of domains that started to frame a core body of knowledge. Job descriptions were explored from roles around the world, competency models were examined from related fields and organizations, and then broader input was sought engaging patient experience and healthcare leaders from the US, the UK, Australia and Canada. The feedback led to hundreds of pages of thoughts on the critical nature and true complexity of patient experience and of the knowledge needed to effectively address it.

The discovery was powerful; a body of knowledge for patient experience leaders that began to shape an identifiable field of practice. It also brought greater clarity to the findings in the “Four Cornerstones” paper. While a focused individual was critical, this alone would not drive patient experience success. Rather an individual needs the skill set and “know-how” to truly impact this central component of the healthcare world.

That leads us to today, where the input and work of over one hundred volunteer leaders and contributors provides an initial framework to explore and a new possibility for shaping the field of patient experience. On Monday, March 5 we unveiled the Patient Experience Body of Knowledge and the 14 domains of knowledge key to an effective patient experience leader. With all the work that has led to this point, it is now that a much broader conversation gets underway.

We invite individuals from all corners of the healthcare system, including patient experience practitioners, healthcare leaders and staff, physicians, patients, families and community members to contribute their voices to the process. For the next 6 weeks, through Monday, April 16, we will be gathering your input to further polish this work. We will share the results of this effort to start Patient Experience Conference 2012. At The Beryl Institute, we believe the patient experience is about every player in the healthcare process and should encompass the voices of all those it impacts.

In healthcare, experience is truly central to all we do. The opportunity to provide a framework for the important work taking place every day in healthcare organizations is a critical global dialogue. I invite and encourage you to join the conversation.

Jason A. Wolf, Ph.D.
Executive Director
The Beryl Institute